1887

Abstract

Summary

Specimens of pus were obtained from gastrostomy site wound infections in 22 children. Polymicrobial flora was found in 21 of the 22 wounds. Aerobic or facultative bacteria only were isolated in eight (36%) instances and mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora were isolated from the other 14 (64%) wounds. A total of 102 bacterial isolates (57 aerobic and 45 anaerobic) and seven cultures of Candida were obtained. The most frequent isolates were Escherichia coli (16 isolates), spp. (14), spp. (14), spp. (12) and (6). Twenty-eight strains producing β-lactamase were isolated from 16 (73%) patients. The presence of polymicrobial aerobic-anaerobic infection, and the isolation of and spp. were more frequent in wounds with gastric leakage than in wounds without gastric leakage (p < 0.05). Bacteria similar to those isolated from the wound were also isolated from blood cultures from three patients—two isolates of and one each of and . All patients received local therapy and 11 were treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. The polymicrobial aerobic-anaerobic flora of gastrostomy site wound infections, especially in association with gastric leakage, and the presence of β-lactamase producers in most of these infections may have important implications for their management.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-43-3-221
1995-09-01
2022-09-25
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