1887

Abstract

Summary

The interactions between phagocytic cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes) and cells released from a biofilm model formed on the surface of cotton threads in an artificial medium were compared with those of phagocytes and bacteria released from a newly developed in-vitro biofilm model. This new model of bacterial biofilm on the surface of cotton threads was developed by soaking cotton threads in rat carboxymethylcellulose pouch exudate and culturing in the exudate. The structure of the biofilm model and the surface structure of the bacteria in the biofilm resembled those observed in infected pouches, and they were quite different from those observed with the biofilm model in artificial medium. Both bacteria released from biofilm models in an artificial medium and those from biofilms in rat carboxymethylcellulose pouch exudate, were almost equally resistant to killing by phagocytes. The sensitivity of these bacteria to phagocytosis was no different from that of normal bacteria grown in artificial medium. Bacteria from both models were also less sensitive to the killing activity of HO. Electronmicroscopy showed that bacteria from both models had some products that interacted with ruthenium red on their surfaces, but the respective quantities of these products differed.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-41-5-359
1994-11-01
2022-11-26
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