1887

Abstract

Summary

Analysis of crude culture filtrate of by Mono Q-anion exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) demonstrated that toxin A had distinct peaks of activity for cytotoxicity and haemagglutination, as also did highly purified toxin A obtained by thyroglobulin affinity chromatography (TG) followed by two sequential anion-exchange chromatographic steps with Q-Sepharose FF and Mono Q. From TG unbound fractions a highly cytotoxic but weakly haemagglutinating variant (toxin A′) of toxin A was obtained by Q-Sepharose FF and Mono Q chromatography. Analysis of toxins A and A’ from cultures of in a chemically defined medium, and of toxin A dialysed against brain heart infusion broth, indicated that A’ was not merely toxin A coupled to a component of the growth medium. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions showed that toxins A and A’ had the same M. Immunoblotting with mouse monospecific A antitoxin showed that five bands larger than the major 240-Kda band were more strongly developed in toxin A than in A’ in denaturing but non-reducing conditions, and in reducing conditions eight bands (38–175 Kda) were seen in toxin A but not A′. Immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody (PCG-4) showed that, in both reducing and non-reducing conditions, two bands of 160 and 155 Kda were more prominent in toxins A and A’ respectively, and four bands (195, 180, 175 and 125 Kda) were detected only in toxin A′.

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1992-03-01
2022-11-29
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