1887

Abstract

Summary

Ninety-one strains isolated from various systemic purulent lesions of 68 patients were examined by physiological and serological tests. Most strains formed a smooth colony (66 strains), did not form spontaneous aggregation of cells in BHI broth culture (79), were non--haemolytic (α-35 or non-41), and belonged to biotype Ia (49) or Ib (34) and to API taxa I (41) or II (38). Almost all of the β-haemolytic strains as well as two-fifths of the non--haemolytic belonged to API taxon I; strains of API taxa II and III were non--haemolytic and non-haemolytic, respectively. Two-fifths (38) of the isolates belonged to one of eight serotypes, and , and more than half (47) to Lancefield groups A, C, F or G, the most frequent being type (19) and group F (33). Fifteen strains carried simultaneously type /group A, /C, /C, /G, /F or /G antigens. Nineteen were neither typable nor groupable. All the 38 serotypable isolates were non--haemolytic and not members of API taxon III, and were serologically and physiologically similar to oral . The isolates from various infected sites—sputum, thorax, abdomen, urogenitalia, skin, eye and dental—exhibited distinct combinations of biological and serological properties. These results suggest that serotyping, haemolytic properties and API taxon, and their combinations, would be useful methods to trace oral in systemic infections.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-36-3-143
1992-03-01
2022-05-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/36/3/medmicro-36-3-143.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-36-3-143&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Skerman V. B. D., McGowan V., Sneath P. H. A. Approved lists of bacterial names. Int J Syst Bacterial 1980; 30:225–420
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Facklam R. R. The major differences in the American and British streptococcus taxonomy schemes with special reference to Streptococcus milleri. Eur J Clin Microbiol 1984; 3:91–93
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Colman G., Williams R. E. O. Taxonomy of some human viridians streptococci. In Wannamaker L. W., Matsen J. M. (eds) Streptococci and streptococcal diseases New York: Academic Press; 1972281–299
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Coykendall A. L., Wesbecher P. M., Gustafson K. B. Streptococcus milleri”, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus intermedius are later synonyms of Streptococcus anginosus. Int J Syst Bacteriol 1987; 37:222–228
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Whiley R. A., Fraser H., Hardie J. M., Beighton D. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedins, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the “Streptococcus milleri group”. J Clin Microbiol 1990; 28:1497–1501
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Whiley R. A., Hardie J. M. DNA-DNA hybridization studies and phenotypic characteristics of strains within the ‘Streptococcus milleri group’. J Gen Microbiol 1989; 135:2623–2633
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hardie J. M. Oral streptococci. In Sneath P. H. A., Mair N. S., Sharpe M. E., Holt J. G. (eds) Bergey’s Manual of systematic bacteriology vol 2 Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins; 19861054–1063
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gossling J. Occurrence and pathogenicity of the Streptococcus milleri group. Rev Infect Dis 1988; 10:257–285
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ruoff K. L. Streptococcus anginosus (“Streptococcus milleri”): the unrecognized pathogen. Clin Microbiol Rev 1988; 1:102–108
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Parker M.T., Ball L. C. Streptococci and aerococci associated with systemic infection in man. J Med Microbiol 1976; 9:275–302
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Van der Au wera P. Clinical significance of Streptococcus milleri. Eur J ClinMicrobiol 1985; 4:386–390
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Admon D., Ephros M. A., Gavish D., Raz R. Infection with Streptococcus milleri. J Infect 1987; 14:55–60
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Ball L. C., Parker M. T. The cultural and biochemical characters of Streptococcus milleri strains isolated from human sources. J Hyg 1979; 82:63–78
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Poole P. M., Wilson G. Occurrence and cultural features of Streptococcus milleri in various body sites. J ClinPathol 1979; 32:764–768
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Unsworth P. F. Hyaluronidase production in Streptococcus milleri in relation to infection. J Clin Pathol 1989; 42:506–510
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Nagata K. Clinical significance of Streptococcus milleri isolated from various suppurative lesions. Kansenshogaku Zasshi 1990; 64:444–454
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Yakushiji T., Katsuki M., Yoshimitsu A., Mizuno J., Inoue M. Isolation and physiological characterization of Streptococcus milleri strains from human dental plaque. Microbios 1988; 55:161–171
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Yakushiji T., Konagawa R., Oda M., Inoue M. Serological variation of oral Streptococcus milleri. J Med Microbiol 1988; 27:145–151
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Yakushiji T., Kitada K., Okita Y., Inoue M. Distribution of Streptococcus milleri in the oral cavities of Japanese children. Microb Ecol Health Dis 1990; 3:171–179
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Rantz L. A., Randall E. Use of autoclaved extracts of hemolytic streptococci for serological grouping. Stanford Med Bull 1955; 13:290–291
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Guthof O. Uberpathogene, “vergrünende Streptokokken”. Streptokokken-Befundebeidentogenen Abszessen und Infiltratenim Bereich der Mundhöhle. Zbl Bakteriol Parasitenkd Infektionskr Hyg Abt I Orig 1956; 166:553–564
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Phillips I., Warren C., Harrison J. M., Sharpies P., Ball L. C., Parker M. T. Antibiotic susceptibility of streptococci from the mouth and blood of patients treated with penicillin or lincomycin and clindamycin. J Med Microbiol 1976; 9:393–404
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Symington J. M. Streptococci isolated from post-extraction bacteraemias. Br J OralSurg 1975; 13:91–94
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Guntheroth W. G. How important are dental procedures as acause of infective endocarditis?. Am J Cardiol 1984; 54:797–801
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Crawford I., Russell C. Streptococci isolated from the bloodstream and gingival crevice of man. J Med Microbiol 1983; 16:263–269
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Murray H. W., Gross K. C., Masur H., Roberts R. B. Seriousinfections caused by Streptococcus milleri. Am J Med 1978; 64:759–764
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Ruoff K. L., Kunz L. J. Identification of viridans streptococci isolated from clinical specimens. J Clin Microbiol 1982; 15:920–925
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Ruoff K. L., Kunz L. J. Use of the rapid STREP system for identification of viridans streptococcal species. J Clin Microbiol 1983; 18:1138–1140
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-36-3-143
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-36-3-143
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error