1887

Abstract

Summary

Immunogold-silver staining is a sensitive staining technique that enables the visualisation of the presence of individual antigens by conventionallight microscopy. The application of this method to detect the antigenic heterogeneity of bacterial surface components and also the localisation of intracellular or extracellular bacteria is described. The latter applicationinvolved selective immuno-silver staining of the extracellular bacteria andcounterstaining of the intracellular bacteria and the eukaryotic cells bycrystal violet. The efficacy of the assay was confirmed by transmission electronmicroscopy of the silver-stained specimens. Immunogold-silver staining was shown to be useful for studying bacterial antigen variation and the uptake of bacteria by eukaryotic cells.

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1990-09-01
2022-08-14
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