1887

Abstract

Summary

Monoclonal antibody (MAb) to diphtheria toxin was produced in mouse hybridomas, and shown by ELISA to be of sub-class IgG. Hybridomas were inoculated into mice to produce ascitic fluid from which MAb was purified by caprylic acid. The MAb was shown by immunoblotting to be directed against the A fragment of the toxin and also against the intact toxin molecule. After conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate, it was used in an immunoassay to detect toxin in culture supernates of and . The assay correlated well with the Elek test and with virulence in guinea-pigs; but it gave occasional false positive results, probably by binding of MAb to defective toxin.

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1990-08-01
2022-01-22
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