1887

Abstract

To analyse the phenotype of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-infected lymphocytes in EBV-associated infections, cells from eight haematopoietic stem cell/liver transplantation recipients with elevated EBV viral loads were examined by a novel quantitative assay designed to identify EBV-infected cells by using a flow cytometric detection of fluorescent hybridization (FISH) assay. By this assay, 0.05–0.78 % of peripheral blood lymphocytes tested positive for EBV, and the EBV-infected cells were CD20 B-cells in all eight patients. Of the CD20 EBV-infected lymphocytes, 48–83 % of cells tested IgD positive and 49–100 % of cells tested CD27 positive. Additionally, the number of EBV-infected cells assayed by using FISH was significantly correlated with the EBV-DNA load, as determined by real-time PCR (  = 0.88, <0.0001). The FISH assay enabled us to characterize EBV-infected cells and perform a quantitative analysis in patients with EBV infection after stem cell/liver transplantation.

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2011-11-01
2020-11-30
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