1887

Abstract

Viral diseases occur wherever sweet potato () is cultivated and because this crop is vegetatively propagated, accumulation and perpetuation of viruses can become a major constraint for production. Up to 90 % reductions in yield have been reported in association with viral infections. About 20 officially accepted or tentative virus species have been found in sweet potato and other species. They include three species of begomoviruses (genus , family ) whose genomes have been fully sequenced. In this investigation, we conducted a search for begomoviruses infecting sweet potato and in Spain and characterized the complete genome of 15 isolates. In addition to sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) and yellowing vein virus, we identified three new begomovirus species and a novel strain of SPLCV. Our analysis also demonstrated that extensive recombination events have shaped the populations of -infecting begomoviruses in Spain. The increased complexity of the unique -infecting begomovirus group, highlighted by our results, open new horizons to understand the phylogeny and evolution of the family .

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2009-10-01
2019-11-17
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