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Abstract

Sand flies (Diptera: Phlebotominae) are proven vectors of various pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. Although mostly known for their pivotal role in the transmission of parasitic protists of the genus that cause leishmaniases, they are also proven or suspected vectors of many arboviruses, some of which threaten human and animal health, causing disorders such as human encephalitis (Chandipura virus) or serious diseases of domestic animals (vesicular stomatitis viruses). We reviewed the literature to summarize the current published information on viruses detected in or isolated from phlebotomine sand flies, excluding the family with the genus , as these have been well investigated and up-to-date reviews are available. Sand fly-borne viruses from four other families (, , and ) and one unclassified group () are reviewed for the first time regarding their distribution in nature, host and vector specificity, and potential natural transmission cycles.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministerstvo Školství, Mládeže a Tělovýchovy (Award LX22NPO5103)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ApplicableNot
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2023-04-05
2024-02-21
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