1887

Abstract

There are extensive interactions between viruses and the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. The outcome of these interactions includes not only direct effects on viral nucleic acids and genome replication, but also the activation of host stress response signalling pathways that can have further, indirect effects on viral life cycles. The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is responsible for the rapid and imprecise repair of DNA double-stranded breaks in the nucleus that would otherwise be highly toxic. Whilst directly repairing DNA, components of the NHEJ machinery, in particular the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), can activate a raft of downstream signalling events that activate antiviral, cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis pathways. This combination of possible outcomes results in NHEJ being pro- or antiviral depending on the infection. In this review we will describe the broad range of interactions between NHEJ components and viruses and their consequences for both host and pathogen.

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2020-07-31
2020-08-06
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