1887

Abstract

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion is more resistant to heat inactivation compared to other prions, but the effect of heat inactivation has been reported to differ depending on the BSE-contaminated tissue state or heating type. We aimed to evaluate the secure level of inactivation of original BSE transmissibility by dry-heating. Cattle tissues affected with BSE were subjected to dry-heat treatment for 20 min at various temperatures ranging from 150 to 1000 °C. To assess the inactivation effect, we conducted protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) and follicular dendritic cell (FDC) assays in transgenic mice expressing bovine prion protein genes. Under dry-heating at 600 °C or higher, BSE cattle tissues lost their transmissibility in transgenic mice. In contrast, transmissibility was detected in the cattle tissues treated at temperatures of 400 °C or lower through the FDC assay combined with PMCA. In this study, we confirmed that transmissibility was eliminated in BSE-affected cattle tissues by dry-heating at 600 °C or higher.

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2019-11-13
2019-12-11
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