1887

Abstract

HPV16 late L1 mRNAs encode a short central exon that is located between HPV16 3′-splice site SA3358 and HPV16 5′-splice site SD3632. While SA3358 is used to produce both HPV16 early mRNAs encoding the E6 and E7 oncogenes, and late mRNAs encoding E4, L1 and L2, SD3632 is used exclusively to produce late L1 mRNA. We have previously identified an 8-nucleotide regulatory RNA element that is required for inclusion of the exon between SA3358 and SD3632 to produce L1 mRNAs at the expense of mRNAs polyadenylated at the HPV16 early polyadenylation signal pAE. Here we show that this HPV16 8-nucleotide splicing enhancer interacts with hnRNP G. Binding of hnRNP G to this element prevents inclusion of the exon between SA3358 and SD3632 on the HPV16 late L1 mRNAs. We concluded that hnRNP G has a splicing inhibitory role and that hnRNP G can control HPV16 mRNA splicing.

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2018-02-01
2019-10-20
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