1887

Abstract

Most patients with avian influenza A H7N9 virus (H7N9) infection suffer from severe illness, accompanied by dysregulated cytokine/chemokine response, delayed viral clearance and impaired neutralizing antibody response. Here, we evaluated the role of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in the pathogenesis of H7N9 infection using an ex vivo infection model. H7N9 infected a significantly higher percentage of PBMCs (23.9 %) than those of avian influenza A H5N1 virus (H5N1) (12.3 %) and pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) (5.5 %) (P <0.01). H7N9 infected significantly more B and T lymphocytes than H5N1. When compared with pH1N1, H7N9-infected PBMCs had significantly higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) at 6 h post-infection (p.i.), but significantly lower levels of IFN-γ and IP-10 at 12 h p.i. Among the PBMCs, CD14+ monocytes were most permissive to H7N9 infection. The percentage of infected CD14+ monocytes was significantly higher for H7N9 than that of pH1N1, but not significantly different from that of H5N1. H7N9-infected monocytes showed higher expression of MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES than that of pH1N1 at 6 h p.i. H7N9- but not pH1N1-infected monocytes died rapidly via apoptosis. Furthermore, pH1N1- but not H7N9-infected monocytes showed increased expression of the monocyte activation and differentiation markers. Unlike pH1N1, H7N9 showed similar PBMC/monocyte cytokine/chemokine expression profile, monocyte cell death and expression of activation/differentiation markers to H5N1. Besides proinflammatory cytokine activation leading to a cytokine storm, impaired IFN-γ production, rapid monocytic death and lack of monocyte differentiation may affect the ability of H7N9-infected innate immune cells to recruit protective adaptive immunity.

Keyword(s): apoptosis , cell death , cytokines , H5N1 , H7N9 and monocytes
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2017-05-30
2019-10-23
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