1887

Abstract

The v- oncoprotein encoded by reticuloendotheliosis virus T strain (Rev-T) is a member of the /NF-κB family of transcription factors capable of transformation of primary chicken spleen and bone marrow cells. Rapid transformation of avian haematopoietic cells by v- occurs through a process of deregulation of multiple protein-encoding genes through its direct effect on their promoters. More recently, upregulation of oncogenic miR-155 and its precursor pre-miR-155 was demonstrated in both Rev-T-infected chicken embryo fibroblast cultures and Rev-T-induced B-cell lymphomas. Through electrophoresis mobility shift assay and reporter analysis on the gga-miR-155 promoter, we showed that the v--induced miR-155 overexpression occurred by the direct binding to one of the putative NF-κB binding sites. Using the v--induced transformation model on chicken embryonic splenocyte cultures, we could demonstrate a dynamic increase in miR-155 levels during the transformation. Transcriptome profiles of lymphoid cells transformed by v- showed upregulation of miR-155 accompanied by downregulation of a number of putative miR-155 targets such as Pu.1 and CEBPβ. We also showed that v- could rescue the suppression of miR-155 expression observed in Marek’s disease virus (MDV)-transformed cell lines, where its functional viral homologue MDV-miR-M4 is overexpressed. Demonstration of gene expression changes affecting major molecular pathways, including organismal injury and cancer in avian macrophages transfected with synthetic mature miR-155, underlines its potential direct role in transformation. Our study suggests that v--induced transformation involves a complex set of events mediated by the direct activation of NF-κB targets, together with inhibitory effects on microRNA targets.

Keyword(s): miR-155 , NF-κB , transformation and v-rel
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2017-04-01
2020-01-24
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