1887

Abstract

Processing of the measles virus haemagglutinin (H) protein was analysed by the pulse-chase method, immunoprecipitation with an anti-H monoclonal antibody and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, combined with the addition of carbonyl cyanide -chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or monensin (inhibitors of intracellular processing of secretory proteins) to cultures and digestion of the protein with endoglycosidase H or neuraminidase. The apparent of the H protein was increased from 74K to 78K during the chase period. Addition of either CCCP or monensin to the chase medium inhibited the appearance of the 78K H protein, but not the immunoreactivity of the H protein or dimer formation, suggesting that these two events occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The 74K H protein processed in the presence of CCCP was fully sensitive to endoglycosidase H digestion, whereas the 74K H protein processed in the presence of monensin was partially resistant to endoglycosidase H. In experiments using H-labelled sugars, [H]galactose was incorporated into the 74K H protein in the presence of monensin. Neuraminidase treatment increased the electrophoretic mobility of the 78K H protein to 74K. Only the 78K H protein was detected on the surface of untreated cells, and it was resistant to endoglycosidase H digestion. These data suggest that after galactose addition sialic acid is added to the H protein in the trans-Golgi complex and then the mature 78K H protein is transported to the cell surface.

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1991-11-01
2022-01-29
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