1887

Abstract

Care-related infections (CRIs) have a negative impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients in intensive care. Among them, fungal infections (e.g. spp. and spp.) have high mortality in critically ill patients, particularly those with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and immunosuppression. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes severe respiratory changes and deregulation of the immune system. Here, we describe a case of fungal infection in an intensive care unit (ICU) patient with COVID-19 caused by , a yeast widely used in the baking and wine production industries. It is also used as a probiotic, both for prevention and as adjunctive therapy in patients with diarrhoea. The patient was admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis of COVID-19, respiratory failure, complications of ARDS and renal failure, and was being treated with antibiotics and vasoactive amines. Later, the patient had diarrhoea and, after supplementation with , he developed a bloodstream infection with . The patient died after 61 days of hospitalization due to thrombocytopenia and bleeding. This case report suggests avoiding the use of probiotics in intensive care patients under the administration of antibiotics and amines, and with damage to the intestinal mucosa and immunodeficiency caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), since these factors could favour the translocation of fungi.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License. The Microbiology Society waived the open access fees for this article.
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2021-08-06
2022-08-14
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