1887

Abstract

is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for burn-wound infection. High incidence, infection severity and increasing resistance characterize -induced burn infection.

To estimate quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent virulence factors of isolates from burn wounds and correlate it to the presence of QS genes.

A cross-sectional descriptive study included 50 . isolates from burn patients in Mansoura University Plastic and Burn Hospital, Egypt. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were done. All isolates were tested for their ability to produce biofilm using a micro-titration assay method. Protease, pyocyanin and rhamnolipid virulence factors were determined using skimmed milk agar, King’s A medium and CTAB agar test, respectively. The identity of QS and genes was confirmed using PCR.

In total, 86 % of isolates had proteolytic activity. Production of pyocyanin pigment was manifested in 66 % of isolates. Altogether, 76 % of isolates were rhamnolipid producers. Biofilm formation was detected in 96 % of isolates. QS and genes were harboured by nearly all isolates except three isolates were negative for both and genes and two isolates were positive for gene and negative for gene. Forty-nine isolates were considered as extremely QS-proficient strains as they produced QS-dependent virulence factors. In contrast, one isolate was a QS deficient strain.

QS affects virulence-factor production and biofilm in burn wounds. Isolates containing and seem to be a crucial regulator of virulence factors and biofilm formation in whereas the gene positively regulates biofilm formation, proteolytic activity, pyocyanin production and rhamnolipid biosurfactant synthesis. The QS regulatory gene affects protease and rhamnolipid production positively.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000211
2021-03-05
2021-04-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/acmi/3/3/acmi000211.html?itemId=/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000211&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Streeter K, Katouli M. Genecology Research Centre, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, Queensland, Australia Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a review of their pathogenesis and prevalence in clinical settings and the environment. Infect Epidemiol Microbiol 2016; 2:25–32 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Rossolini GM, Mantengoli E. Treatment and control of severe infections caused by multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2005; 11:17–32 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Norbury W, Herndon DN, Tanksley J, Jeschke MG, Finnerty CC. Infection in burns. Surg Infect 2016; 17:250–255 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Japoni A, Farshad S. Alborzi A. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: burn infection, treatment and antibacterial resistance. Iran Red Crescent Med J 2009; 11:244–253
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Taylor PK, Yeung ATY, Hancock REW. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies. J Biotechnol 2014; 191:121–130 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Rutherford ST, Bassler BL. Bacterial quorum sensing: its role in virulence and possibilities for its control. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 2012; 2:a012427 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Sarabhai S, Kaur A, Capalash N, Sharma P. Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa . In Kahlon RS. editor Mechanism and Regulation of Virulence. Pseudomonas Molecular and Applied Biology, 1st ed., chapter 6. Springer International Publishing; 2016 pp 231–256
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Luo J, Kong J-L, Dong B-Y, Huang H, Wang K et al. Baicalein attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and relieves the inflammatory response in P. aeruginosa-infected macrophages by downregulating the MAPK and NFκB signal-transduction pathways. Drug Des Devel Ther 2016; 10:183–203 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Gardner SE, Frantz RA, Saltzman CL, Hillis SL, Park H et al. Diagnostic validity of three swab techniques for identifying chronic wound infection. Wound Repair Regen 2006; 14:548–557 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  10. CLSI Performance standards for antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility tests, 26th ed. CLSI standards M100S. Wayne, PA: Clinical and laboratory standards institute, Pennsylvania; 2016
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Stepanović S, Vuković D, Hola V, Di Bonaventura G, Djukić S et al. Quantification of biofilm in microtiter plates: overview of testing conditions and practical recommendations for assessment of biofilm production by staphylococci. APMIS 2007; 115:891–899 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Brown MR, Foster JH. A simple diagnostic milk medium for Pseudomonas aeruginosa . J Clin Pathol 1970; 23:172–177 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Essar DW, Eberly L, Hadero A, Crawford IP. Identification and characterization of genes for a second anthranilate synthase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: interchangeability of the two anthranilate synthases and evolutionary implications. J Bacteriol 1990; 172:884–900 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Pinzon NM, Ju L-K. Improved detection of rhamnolipid production using agar plates containing methylene blue and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide. Biotechnol Lett 2009; 31:1583–1588 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Cotar A I, Dinu S O RIN, Chifiriuc MC, Banu O T I LIA, Iordache C et al. Screening of molecular markers of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from clinical infections. Rom Biotechnol Lett 2008; 13:3765–3771
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Maurice NM, Bedi B, Sadikot RT. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: host response and clinical implications in lung infections. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2018; 58:428–439 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Choudhary V, Pal N, Hooja S. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from clinical specimens in a tertiary care hospital. J Mahatma Gandhi Inst Med Sci 2019; 24:19–22
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Revathi G, Puri J, Jain BK. Bacteriology of burns. Burns 1998; 24:347–349 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Jabalameli F, Mirsalehian A, Khoramian B, Aligholi M, Khoramrooz SS et al. Evaluation of biofilm production and characterization of genes encoding type III secretion system among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn patients. Burns 2012; 38:1192–1197 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Heydari S, Eftekhar F. Biofilm formation and β-lactamase production in burn isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Jundishapur J Microbiol 2015; 8:e15514 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Ahmed AA, Salih FA. Low concentrations of local honey modulate Exotoxin A expression, and quorum sensing related virulence in drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from infected burn wounds. Iran J Basic Med Sci 2019; 22:568–575 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Khalil MAEF, Ibrahim Sonbol F, Mohamed AFB, Ali SS, Sonbol F I. Comparative study of virulence factors among ESβL-producing and nonproducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates. Turk J Med Sci 2015; 45:60–69 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Macin S, Akarca M, Sener B, Akyon Y. Comparison of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with and without cystic fibrosis. Revista Romana de Medicina de Laborator 2017; 25:327–334 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Laxmi M, Bhat SG. Characterization of pyocyanin with radical scavenging and antibiofilm properties isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BTRY1. 3 Biotech 2016; 6:27–32 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Khadim MM. Marjani M F A. pyocyanin and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn infections in Baghdad, Iraq. Biological 2019; 12:131–145
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Nickzad A, Déziel E. The involvement of rhamnolipids in microbial cell adhesion and biofilm development - an approach for control?. Lett Appl Microbiol 2014; 58:447–453 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  27. O'Toole GA, Kolter R. Initiation of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS365 proceeds via multiple, convergent signalling pathways: a genetic analysis. Mol Microbiol 1998; 28:449–461 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Sauer K, Camper AK, Ehrlich GD, Costerton JW, Davies DG. Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays multiple phenotypes during development as a biofilm. J Bacteriol 2002; 184:1140–1154 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  29. LaSarre B, Federle MJ. Exploiting quorum sensing to confuse bacterial pathogens. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 2013; 77:73–111 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Zhu H, Bandara R, Conibear TCR, Thuruthyil SJ, Rice SA et al. Pseudomonas aeruginosa with lasI quorum-sensing deficiency during corneal infection. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2004; 45:1897–1903 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  31. El-Khashaab TH, Erfan DM, Kamal A, El-Moussely LM, Ismail DK. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and quorum sensing lasR gene in patients with wound infection. Egypt J Med Microbiol 2016; 25:101–108 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Li H, Li X, Wang Z, Fu Y, Ai Q et al. Autoinducer-2 regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation and virulence production in a dose-dependent manner. BMC Microbiol 2015; 15:192–200 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Bleves S, Soscia C, Nogueira-Orlandi P, Lazdunski A, Filloux A. Quorum sensing negatively controls type III secretion regulon expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. J Bacteriol 2005; 187:3898–3902 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Lee J, Zhang L. The hierarchy quorum sensing network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa . Protein Cell 2015; 6:26–41 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Aboushleib HM, Omar HM, Abozahra R, Elsheredy A, Baraka K. Correlation of quorum sensing and virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Egypt. J Infect Dev Ctries 2015; 9:1091–1099 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Henkel M, Schmidberger A, Kühnert C, Beuker J, Bernard T et al. Kinetic modeling of the time course of N-butyryl-homoserine lactone concentration during batch cultivations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2013; 97:7607–7616 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Van Delden C, Iglewski BH. Cell-to-cell signaling and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. Emerg Infect Dis 1998; 4:551–560 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Reuter K, Steinbach A, Helms V. Interfering with bacterial quorum sensing. Perspect Medicin Chem 2016; 8:PMC-S13209 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Guerra-Santos L, Käppeli O, Fiechter A. Dependence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa continous culture biosurfactant production on nutritional and environmental factors. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 1986; 24:443–448 [CrossRef]
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Schaber JA, Carty NL, McDonald NA, Graham ED, Cheluvappa R et al. Analysis of quorum sensing-deficient clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. J Med Microbiol 2004; 53:841–853 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Karatuna O, Yagci A. Analysis of quorum sensing-dependent virulence factor production and its relationship with antimicrobial susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory isolates. Clin Microbiol Infect 2010; 16:1770–1775 [CrossRef][PubMed]
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000211
Loading
/content/journal/acmi/10.1099/acmi.0.000211
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error