1887

Abstract

Modernization has thrown humanity and other forms of life on our planet into a ditch of problems. Poverty, climate change, injustice and environmental degradation are a few of the shared global problems. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. The SDGs are well structured to address the global challenges we face including poverty, inequalities, hunger, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice. Five years into the implementation, the SDGs have been driven mainly by international donors and ‘professional’ international development organizations. The world is left with 10 years to achieve these ambitious goals and targets. Various reviews show that little has been achieved overall, and the SDGs will not be a reality if a new strategy is not in place to bring inclusion. Microbiology, the scientific discipline of microbes, their effects and practical uses has insightful influence on our day-to-day living. We present how microbiology and microbiologists could increase the scorecard and accelerate these global goals. Microbiology has a direct link to achieving SDGs addressing food security, health and wellbeing, clean energy, environmental degradation and climate change. A non-classical growing relationship exists between microbiology and other SDGs such as peace, justice, gender equality, decent work and economic growth. The pledge of ‘Leave No One Behind’ will fast track progress and microbiology is in a better position to make this work.

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2020-03-23
2020-06-04
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