1887

Abstract

Cutaneous leishmaniasis causes physical disfigurement and impairment on affected individuals, however, little attention has been paid to it eradication. The situation of this neglected disease is complicated with the expansion of the non-human pathogenic complex causing infection in humans. We have previously shown that the extract from has leishmanicidal activity against promastigote stages of the complex isolate from Ghana and . The extract of has shown to have anti-inflammatory, wound-healing ability, antiallergic, antimalarial and antischistosomal activity. However, the concentration threshold of extract required for leishmanicidal activity against the emerging human pathogenic complex isolates is not clear.

To test for the concentration threshold of extract required to obtain ideal leishmanicidal activity against the promastigote stage of human pathogenic complex isolates from Ghana.

The ethanolic leaf extract of was serially diluted and tested against the promastigote stage of the complex. Parasite inhibition was measured at 590 nm using a spectrophotometer after staining parasites with trypan blue. To select the threshold concentration for maximum inhibition of the promastigote stage of the complex, the concentration cut-off statistic was used.

The MIC of extract for promastigote inhibition was 62.3 μg ml. The highest promastigote inhibition was observed at 72 h.

We show that a MIC of 62.3 μg ml of leaf extract exhibits an ideal leishmanicidal activity against the promastigote stage of complex isolates.

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2019-09-01
2020-01-28
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