1887

Abstract

There is a need for new combination regimens for tuberculosis. Identifying synergistic drug combinations can avoid toxic side effects and reduce treatment times. Using a fluorescent rifampicin conjugate, we demonstrated that synergy between cell wall inhibitors and rifampicin was associated with increased accumulation of rifampicin. Increased accumulation was also associated with increased cellular permeability.

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2019-03-20
2021-10-28
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