1887

Abstract

is a common colonizer of the human gut and in doing so it must be able to resist the actions of the host’s innate defences. Bile salts are a class of molecules that possess potent antibacterial activity that control growth. Bacteria that colonize and survive in that niche must be able to resist the action of bile salts, but the mechanisms by which does so are poorly understood. Here we show that FadB is a bile-induced oxidoreductase which mediates bile salt resistance and when heterologously expressed in renders them resistant. Deletion of attenuated survival of in a model of the human distal colon.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Iraqi Cultural Attaché in London
    • Principle Award Recipient: AmjedAlsultan
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2023-03-22
2024-07-20
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