1887

Abstract

This study examined alteration of specific virulence traits associated with phenotypic changes seen when a low-passage disease-associated and well maintained parent strain of was compared to a laboratory-grown spontaneous variant/mutant. Clinical isolates of recovered from periodontitis patients typically grow as rough, adherent colonies on primary culture but undergo transformation to smooth, non-adherent colonies following repeated passage The relationship of these phenotypic changes to the virulence of the organism or to the processes that underlie this transformation are not understood. A fresh clinical isolate, designated strain CU1000, was obtained from the first molar site of a patient with classical signs of localized juvenile periodontitis and used as the parent strain to study virulence-related phenotypes. Following several passages of CU1000 on selective agar, a spontaneous variant that demonstrated smooth, opaque, non-adherent colonies was isolated and designated strain CU1060. This study compared the properties of these two strains with respect to colony morphology, autoaggregation, surface appendages, adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA), LPS chemotype and activity, induction of fibroblast proteinase activity and antigenic properties. CU1000 demonstrated rough, raised, star-positive colonies which upon electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of large, flexible, bundled fibrils. In addition, CU1000 showed adherence to SHA, several unique protein antigens and elevated endotoxin and fibroblast proteinase activity. CU1060, on the other hand, showed minimal adherence to SHA and fewer reactive proteins compared to the fresh clinical isolates. This strain formed smooth, opaque colonies on agar, showed minimal fibril formation and limited endotoxin and fibroblast-proteinase-inducing activity. These findings demonstrate that clinical isolates of undergo significant virulence-reducing phenotypic alterations during passage and support the need to study this organism in its clinical form.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-145-6-1335
1999-06-01
2019-11-12
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-145-6-1335
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