1887

Abstract

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from five species of oral , strains 381 and ATCC 33277, ATCC 33269, ATCC 15930, ATCC 25611 and ATCC 33547, were extracted from whole cells by the phenol/water procedure, and subsequently purified by treatment with nuclease and ultracentrifugation. The LPS were composed of hexoses, glucosamine, fatty acids and phosphorus. Heptose and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate were not detected. The LPS preparations from strains 381 and ATCC 33277 presented very similar SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns when stained with ammoniacal silver. They produced a fused precipitin band against an antiserum to 381 LPS in immunodiffusion tests. Antisera raised against the LPS from and reacted with the LPS prepared from all the oral strains except those of . All the LPS preparations were mitogenic for spleen cells of BALB/c (nu/nu) mice, but not for thymus cells from C3H/HeN mice. The LPS induced marked mitogenic responses and polyclonal B cell activation for spleen cells of not only C3H/HeN (LPS responder) mice, but also C3H/HeJ (LPS nonresponder) mice. The mitogenic responses were not suppressed significantly upon addition of polymyxin B to the reaction mixture. These LPS also enhanced interleukin-1 production by murine peritoneal macrophages and mouse cell line J744.1 macrophages. Hydrolysis of ATCC 33277 LPS in 1 -HCl at 100 °C for 1 h yielded lipid and polysaccharide. The lipid portion was largely composed of fatty acids and glucosamine, and was mitogenic for spleen cells from C3H/HeJ as well as C3H/HeN mice, while the polysaccharide portion induced no significant mitogenic responses under similar experimental conditions.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-134-11-2867
1988-11-01
2021-10-25
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