1887

Abstract

has been isolated from diseased cats and horses, but to date only a single fully assembled genome of this species, of an isolate from a horse, has been characterized. This study aimed to characterize and compare the completely assembled genomes of four clinical isolates of from three domestic cats, assembled with the aid of short- and long-read sequencing methods. The completed genomes encoded a median of 759 ORFs (range 743–777) and had a median average nucleotide identity of 98.2 % with the genome of the available equid origin reference strain. Comparative genomic analysis revealed the occurrence of multiple horizontal gene transfer events and significant genome reassortment. This had resulted in the acquisition or loss of numerous genes within the Australian felid isolate genomes, encoding putative proteins involved in DNA transfer, metabolism, DNA replication, host cell interaction and restriction modification systems. Additionally, a novel mycoplasma phage was detected in one Australian felid isolate by genomic analysis and visualized using cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This study has highlighted the complex genomic dynamics in different host environments. Furthermore, the sequences obtained in this work will enable the development of new diagnostic tools, and identification of future infection control and treatment options for the respiratory disease complex in cats.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Feline Health Research Fund
    • Principle Award Recipient: PaolaK Vaz
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-03-28
2024-04-22
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