1887

Abstract

, a plant pathogen, is primarily transmitted through contaminated seeds and insect vectors, with the corn flea beetle () being the primary carrier. is a bacterium belonging to the order and can lead to crop diseases that have a significant economic impact worldwide. Due to its high potential for spread, is classified as a quarantine organism in numerous countries. Despite its impact on agriculture, the limited genome sequences of hamper understanding of its pathogenicity and host specificity, and the development of effective control strategies. In this study, a strain (C10109_Jinnung) was discovered in the faecal matter of the Critically Endangered western ground parrot/kyloring () in Australia, which to our knowledge is the first reported genome from a bird source. Whole-genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis of strain C10109_Jinnung, obtained from a captive psittacine, provides new insights into the genetic diversity and potential transmission route for the spread of beyond insects and plants, where is typically studied. Our findings provide new insights into the potential transmission route for spread of and expand the known transmission agents beyond insects and plants. Expanding the catalogue of genomes is fundamental to improving understanding of the pathogenicity, evolution and dissemination, and to develop effective control strategies to reduce the substantial economic losses associated with in various crops and the potential impact of endangered animal species.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2023-09-04
2024-07-22
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