1887

Abstract

The population structure of a set of OXA-48-producing isolates belonging to sequence type 11 (ST11 Kp-OXA) and obtained from two hospitals in Madrid in the period from 2012 to 2015 was studied by genome sequencing. Overall, 97 ST11 Kp-OXA isolates were sequenced and their population structure and demography were studied by Bayesian phylodynamic analysis using core-genome SNVs. In total, 92 isolates were from Hospital La Paz, 57 of them from two selected units. The remaining five isolates were from different units of Hospital Doce de Octubre. Altogether, 96 out of the 97 ST11 Kp-OXA isolates could be ascribed to a single lineage that evolved into three sublineages. Demographic inference showed an expansion of the ST11 Kp-OXA in the first half of 2013 in agreement with the registered incidences. Dated phylogeny showed transmission clusters within hospital wards, between wards and between hospitals. The ST11 Kp-OXA outbreak in Hospital La Paz was largely due to the expansion of a single clone that was transmitted between different units and to Hospital Doce de Octubre. This clone diverged into three sub-lineages and spread out following a mixed mode of neutral core-genome evolution with some features of antibiotic selection, frequent large deletions and plasmid loss and gain events.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Award PI19/01356)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JesúsMingorance
  • Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Award PI16/01209)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JesúsMingorance
  • Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Award PI13/01218)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JesúsMingorance
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2022-04-08
2022-05-18
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