1887

Abstract

Specific lineages of serogroup O1 are notorious for causing cholera pandemics, of which there have been seven since the 1800s. Much is known about the sixth pandemic (1899–1923) and the ongoing seventh pandemic (1961–present), but we know very little about the bacteriology of pandemics 1 to 5. Moreover, although we are learning about the contribution of non-O1 non-pandemic to cholera dynamics during the current pandemic, we know almost nothing about their role in the past. A recent ancient DNA study has presented what may be the first molecular evidence of a infection from the fifth cholera pandemic period (1886–1887 AD) in Argentina. Here, we place the molecular evidence from that study into the genomic context of non-pandemic from Latin America and elsewhere, and show that a gene fragment amplified from ancient DNA is most similar to that of from the Americas, and from Argentina. Our results corroborate and reinforce the findings of the original study, and collectively suggest that even in the 1880s, non-pandemic local to the Americas may have caused sporadic infections in Argentina, just as we know this to have happened during the seventh pandemic in Latin America.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministerio de Salud de la Nación
    • Principle Award Recipient: JosefinaCampos
  • Wellcome Trust (GB) (Award 206194)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NicholasR. Thomson
  • Wellcome Trust (GB) (Award 206194)
    • Principle Award Recipient: MatthewJ Dorman
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2021-06-15
2021-07-29
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