1887

Abstract

In 2010, Burkina Faso completed the first nationwide mass-vaccination campaign of a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine, drastically reducing the incidence of disease caused by serogroup A meningococci. Since then, other strains, such as those belonging to serogroups W, X and C, have continued to cause outbreaks within the region. A carriage study was conducted in 2016 and 2017 in the country to characterize the meningococcal strains circulating among healthy individuals following the mass-vaccination campaign. Four cross-sectional carriage evaluation rounds were conducted in two districts of Burkina Faso, Kaya and Ouahigouya. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected for the detection of by culture. Confirmed isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing for molecular characterization. Among 13 758 participants, 1035 (7.5 %) . isolates were recovered. Most isolates (934/1035; 90.2 %) were non-groupable and primarily belonged to clonal complex (CC) 192 (822/934; 88 %). Groupable isolates (101/1035; 9.8 %) primarily belonged to CCs associated with recent outbreaks in the region, such as CC11 (serogroup W) and CC10217 (serogroup C); carried serogroup A isolates were not detected. Phylogenetic analysis revealed several CC11 strains circulating within the country, several of which were closely related to invasive isolates. Three sequence types (STs) were identified among eleven CC10217 carriage isolates, two of which have caused recent outbreaks in the region (ST-10217 and ST-12446). Our results show the importance of carriage studies to track the outbreak-associated strains circulating within the population in order to inform future vaccination strategies and molecular surveillance programmes.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • GAVI Alliance
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
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2020-12-11
2021-08-02
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