1887

Abstract

The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium RAY209 is capable of establishing strong root attachment during early plant development at 7 days post-inoculation. The transcriptional response of RAY209 was measured using RNA-seq during early (day 2) and sustained (day 7) root colonization of canola plants, capturing RAY209 differentiation from a medium-suspended cell state to a strongly root-attached cell state. Transcriptomic data was collected in an identical manner during RAY209 interaction with soybean roots to explore the putative root colonization response to this globally relevant crop. Analysis indicated there is an increased number of significantly differentially expressed genes between medium-suspended and root-attached cells during early soybean root colonization relative to sustained colonization, while the opposite temporal pattern was observed for canola root colonization. Regardless of the plant host, root-attached RAY209 cells exhibited the least amount of differential gene expression between early and sustained root colonization. Root-attached cells of either canola or soybean roots expressed high levels of a fasciclin gene homolog encoding an adhesion protein, as well as genes encoding hydrolases, multiple biosynthetic processes, and membrane transport. Notably, while RAY209 ABC transporter genes of similar function were transcribed during attachment to either canola or soybean roots, several transporter genes were uniquely differentially expressed during colonization of the respective plant hosts. In turn, both canola and soybean plants expressed genes encoding pectin lyase and hydrolases – enzymes with purported function in remodelling extracellular matrices in response to RAY209 colonization. RAY209 exhibited both a core regulatory response and a planthost-specific regulatory response to root colonization, indicating that RAY209 specifically adjusts its cellular activities to adapt to the canola and soybean root environments. This transcriptomic data defines the basic RAY209 response as both a canola and soybean commercial crop and seed inoculant.

Keyword(s): canola , Delftia , inoculant , PGPR , RNA-seq and soybean
Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Jordyn Bergsveinson , Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada , (Award PDF)
  • Christopher K Yost , Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada , (Award CRD)
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2020-11-05
2021-03-02
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