1887

Abstract

Despite universal susceptibility to β-lactams, resistance to second-line antimicrobials (e.g. erythromycin) is increasingly common among group A (GAS). To better understand the frequency of regional GAS antimicrobial resistance, we screened a previously described GAS strain collection from Houston, TX, USA, for resistance to commonly used antimicrobials. A total of 100/929 (10.8 %) showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial. Tetracycline resistance was identified in 52 (5.6 %) GAS strains. The cumulative frequency of erythromycin and clindamycin resistance [macrolide (M) and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) phenotypes] was greatest among invasive GAS strains (9.9 %) compared to that of strains derived from any other infection type (5.9 %, =0.045). We identified types 11, 75, 77 and 92 as the only types with high (e.g. >50 %) within- type resistance and contributing to the majority (24/26; 92 %) of erythromycin/clindamycin resistance in invasive GAS. High-frequency resistance types were also significantly overrepresented in invasive GAS strains as indicated by invasive index. We performed whole-genome sequencing to define genetic elements associated with resistance among types 11, 75, 77 and 92. Diverse mobile elements contributed to GAS resistance including transposons, integrative conjugative elements, prophage and a plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis suggests recent clonal emergence of GAS strains. Our findings indicate that less frequently encountered GAS types disproportionately contribute to resistance phenotypes, are defined by diverse mobile genetic elements and may favour invasive disease.

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2019-11-01
2019-12-11
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