1887

Abstract

Enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) is an important human pathogen worldwide. Although serotype O157 is currently the most dominant and important EHEC strain, serotypes O26, O111, O91, O103 and O121 are also recognized as serious pathogens that affect public health. EHEC outbreaks often occur in nurseries and elderly care facilities. In 2012, a nursery outbreak of EHEC O121 occurred during which the bacterium acquired a plasmid-borne extended-spectrum -lactamase (ESBL) gene. ESBL-producing O86 was concurrently isolated from one of the EHEC patients. Therefore, we investigated the isolates by whole-genome sequence (WGS) analysis to elucidate the transmission dynamics of the EHEC strains and the ESBL plasmid. According to WGS-based phylogeny, all 17 EHEC O121 isolates were clonal, while O86 was genetically distant from the EHEC O121 isolates. The complete sequence of an ESBL plasmid encoding the CTX-M-55 -lactamase was determined using S1-PFGE bands, and subsequent mapping of the WGS reads confirmed that the plasmid sequences from EHEC O121 and O86 were identical. Furthermore, conjugation experiments showed that the plasmid was capable of conjugative transfer. These results support the hypothesis that EHEC O121 acquired an ESBL-producing plasmid from O86 during the outbreak. This report demonstrates the importance of implementing preventive measures during EHEC outbreaks to control both secondary infection and the spread of antimicrobial resistance factors.

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2019-07-01
2019-10-15
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