1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes of several species of bacteria, some of which were catalase positive, was examined in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. When all conditions other than the oxygen tension were identical, killing after 30 min was slightly greater in aerobic than in anaerobic conditions. However, after 60 and 120 min the difference between aerobic and anaerobic killing was smaller, and killing was nearly complete for all strains tested. These results conflict with the common opinion that oxygen is essential for efficient killing. Minor differences in experimental conditions can greatly influence results, and may be responsible for the discrepancy between this study and some previous studies on this subject.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-18-2-173
1984-10-01
2022-05-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/18/2/medmicro-18-2-173.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-18-2-173&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Baldridge C. W., Gerard R. W. 1933; The extra respiration of phagocytosis. American Journal of Physiology 103:235–236
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bjornson A. B., Altemeier W. A., Bjornson H. S. 1976; Comparison of the in vitro bactericidal activity of human serum and leukocytes against Bacteroides fragilis and Fusobacterium mortiferum in aerobic and anaerobic environments. Infection and Immunity 14:843–847
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Elsbach P., Weiss J. 1983; A reevaluation of the roles of the 02-dependent and 02-independent microbicidal systems of phagocytes. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 5:843–853
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Holmes B., Page A. R., Good R. A. 1967; Studies of the metabolic activity of leukocytes from patients with a genetic abnormality of phagocytic function. Journal of Clinical Investigation 47:1422–1432
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Holmes B., Page A. R., Windhorst D. B., Quie P. G., White J. G., Good R. A. 1968; The metabolic pattern and phagocytic function of leukocytes from children with chronic granulomatous disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 155:888–901
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Ingham H. R., Sisson P. R., Middleton R. L., Narang H. K., Codd A. A., Selkon J. B. 1981; Phagocytosis and killing of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Journal of Medical Microbiology 14:391–399
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Johnston R. B. 1980; Biochemical defects of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes associated with disease. In Sbarra A. J., Strauss R. (eds) The reticuloendothelial system, a comprehensive treatise. Vol II Biochemistry and metabolism, Plenum Press; New York: pp 397–422
    [Google Scholar]
  8. KlebanoffS J., Clark R. A. 1978; The neutrophil: function and clinical disorders. Elsevier/North Holland Biomedical Press; Amsterdam: pp 383–300
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Mandell G. L. 1974; Bactericidal activity of aerobic and anaerobic polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Infection and Immunity 9:337–341
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Mandell G. L., Hook E. W. 1969; Leukocyte bactericidal activity in chronic granulomatous disease: correlation of bacterial hydrogen peroxide production and susceptibility to intracellular killing. Journal of Bacteriology 100:531–532
    [Google Scholar]
  11. McRipley R. J., Sbarra A. J. 1967; Role of the phagocyte in host-parasite interactions. XI. Relationship between stimulated oxidative metabolism and hydrogen peroxide formation and intracellular killing. Journal of Bacteriology 94:1417–1424
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Okamura N., Spitznagel J. K. 1982; Outer membrane mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have lipopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to the bactericidal activity of anaerobic human neutrophils. Infection and Immunity 36:1086–1095
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Quie P. G., White J. G., Holmes B., Good R. A. 1967; In vitro bacterial capacity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: diminished activity in chronic granulomatous disease of childhood. Journal of Clinical Investigation 46:668–679
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Roos D. 1980; The metabolic response to phagocytosis. In Weissman G. (ed) The cell biology of inflammation. Elsevier/North Holland Biomedical Press; Amsterdam: pp 337–385
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Segal A. W., Harper A. M., Garcia R. C., Merzbach D. 1982; The action of cells from patients with chronic granulomatous disease on Straphylococcus aureus . Journal of Medical Microbiology 15:441–449
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Shah H. N., Williams R. A. D., Bowden G. H., Hardie J. M. 1976; Comparison of the biochemical properties of Bacteroides melaninogenicus from human dental plaque and other sites. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 41:473–492
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Tomita T., Kanegasaki S. 1982; Enhanced phagocytic response of macrophages to bacteria by physical impact caused by bacterial motility or centrifugation. Infection and Immunity 38:865–870
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Weening R. S., Roos D., Loos J. A. 1974; Oxygen consumption of phagocytizing cells in human leukocyte and granulocyte preparations. A comparative study. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine 83:570–576
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Weiss J., Victor M., Stendhal O., Elsbach P. 1982; Killing gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Role of an 02-independent bactericidal system. Journal of Clinical Investigation 69:959–970
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-18-2-173
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-18-2-173
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error