1887

Abstract

The spread of virus infection within an organism is partially dictated by the receptor usage of the virus and can be influenced by sorting signals present in the viral glycoproteins expressed in infected cells. In previous studies, we have shown that the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion protein (F) of the measles virus (MV) vaccine strain MV harbour tyrosine-dependent sorting signals which influence virus spread in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells to a similar degree. In contrast with the vaccine strain, MV wild-type virus does not use CD46 but CD150/SLAM and a not clearly identified molecule on epithelial cells as receptors. To determine differences in viral spread between vaccine and wild-type virus, we generated recombinant MV expressing glycoproteins of both the wild-type strain WTFb and the corresponding tyrosine mutants. In contrast with observations based on vaccine virus glycoproteins, mutations in wild-type virus H and F differently influenced cell-to-cell fusion and replication in polarized epithelia and lymphocytes. For wild-type H, our data suggest a key role of the cytoplasmic tyrosine signal for virus dissemination . It seems to be important for efficient virus spread between lymphocytes, while the tyrosine signal in the F protein gains importance in epithelial cells as both signals have to be intact to allow efficient spread of infection within epithelia.

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2009-10-01
2019-11-18
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