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Abstract

Borna disease virus 1 (BoDV-1) is a highly neurotropic RNA virus that can establish persistent infection in the central nervous system and cause cognitive dysfunction in neonatally infected rats. However, the mechanisms that lead to this cognitive impairment remain unclear. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repair are associated with brain development and cognition. If DNA repair in the brain is reduced or delayed and DNA damage accumulates, abnormal cognitive function may result. We generated a rat model of BoDV-1 infection during the neonatal period and assessed behavioural changes using the open field test and Morris water maze. The levels of DSBs were determined by immunofluorescence and comet assays. Western blotting assessed proteins associated with DNA repair pathways. The results showed that BoDV-1 downregulated the ATR/Chk1 signalling pathway in the brain, impairing DNA damage repair and increasing the number of DSBs, which ultimately leads to cognitive dysfunction. Our findings suggest a molecular mechanism by which BoDV-1 interferes with DNA damage repair to cause learning and memory impairment. This provides a theoretical basis for elucidating BoDV-1-induced neurodevelopmental impairment.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Award No. 2021MD703922)
    • Principle Award Recipient: GuoYujie
  • Chongqing Postdoctoral Science Fund Project (Award No. cstc2021jcyj-bshX0111)
    • Principle Award Recipient: GuoYujie
  • Chongqing Technology Innovation and Application Development Special Project (Award No. cstc2021jscx-msxm0035)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XuXiaoyan
  • the Natural Science Foundation Project of China (Award No. 81820108015)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XiePeng
  • the Non-Profit Central Research Institute Fund of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (Award No. 2019PT320002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XiePeng
  • the National Key R&D Program of China (Award No. 2017YFA0505700)
    • Principle Award Recipient: XiePeng
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001813
2022-12-15
2024-07-13
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