1887

Abstract

Human pathogens belonging to the genus, in the family, are transmitted primarily by mosquitoes. The signs and symptoms associated with these viruses include fever and polyarthralgia, defined as joint pain and inflammation, as well as encephalitis. In the last decade, our understanding of the interactions between members of the alphavirus genus and the human host has increased due to the re-appearance of the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in Asia and Europe, as well as its emergence in the Americas. Alphaviruses affect host immunity through cytokines and the interferon response. Understanding alphavirus interactions with both the innate immune system as well as the various cells in the adaptive immune systems is critical to developing effective therapeutics. In this review, we summarize the latest research on alphavirus-host cell interactions, underlying infection mechanisms, and possible treatments.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/jgv.0.001644
2021-08-26
2022-11-26
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