1887

Abstract

Turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) is the causative agent of an immune-mediated disease in turkeys, haemorrhagic enteritis, through targeting B lymphocytes. In the present study, we investigated the role of sialic acid in TAdV-3 entry and characterized the structural components of TAdV-3 receptor(s) on RP19, B lymphoblastoid cells. Removal of the cell-surface sialic acids by neuraminidases or blocking of sialic acids by wheat germ agglutinin lectin reduced virus infection. Pre-incubation of cells with lectin or agglutinin resulted in virus reduction, suggesting that TAdV-3 uses both α2,3-linked and α2,6-linked sialic acids as attachment receptor. Virus infectivity data from RP19 cells treated with sodium periodate, proteases (trypsin or bromelain) or metabolic inhibitors (--1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol, tunicamycin, or benzyl -acetyl-α--galactosaminide) indicated that -linked, but not -linked, carbohydrates are part of the sialylated receptor and they are likely based on a membrane glycoprotein, rather than a glycolipid. Furthermore, our data, in conjunction with previous findings, implies that the secondary receptor for TAdV-3 is a protein molecule since the inhibition of glycolipid biosynthesis did not affect the virus infection, which was rather reduced by protease treatment. We can conclude that terminal sialic acids attached to -linked membrane glycoproteins on B cells are used for virus attachment and are essential for successful virus infection.

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2020-05-26
2021-05-12
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