1887

Abstract

Marek’s disease virus (MDV), a causative agent of Marek’s disease, has evolved its virulence partly because the current control strategies fail to provide sterilizing immunity. 3 (GaHV-3) and turkey herpesvirus have been developed as bivalent vaccines to improve upon the level of protection elicited by single formulations. Since the passage of vaccines can result in attenuation, a GaHV-3 strain 301B/1 was cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) by inserting the -F replicon into the virus genome. A fully infectious virus, v301B-BAC, was reconstituted from the 301B/1 BAC clone and had similar growth kinetics comparable to that of the parental 301B/1 virus with strong reactivity against anti-301B/1 chicken sera. Protective efficacies of v301B-BAC, parental 301B/1, and SB-1 vaccine were evaluated against a very virulent MDV Md5 challenge. Clinical signs were significantly lower in the v301B-BAC vaccinated groups (24–25 %), parental 301B/1 (29 %) compare to that of non-vaccinated control (100%) and the removal of BAC sequences from v301B-BAC genome further reduced this to 17 %. The protective indices of v301B-BACs (75–76 %) were comparable with those of both the 301B/1 and the SB-1 vaccine (71%). Removal of the -F replicon resulted in a reconstituted virus with a protective index of 83 %. The shedding of challenge virus was notably lower in the v301B-BAC, and v301B-delBAC vaccinated groups. Overall, the protective efficacy of the 301B-BAC-derived vaccine virus against a very virulent MDV challenge was comparable to that of the parental 301B/1 virus as well as the SB-1 vaccine virus.

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2020-03-05
2020-06-04
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