1887

Abstract

Beet chlorosis virus (genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae), which is persistently transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae, is part of virus yellows in sugar beet and causes interveinal yellowing as well as significant yield loss in Beta vulgaris. To allow reverse genetic studies and replace vector transmission, an infectious cDNA clone under cauliflower mosaic virus 35S control in a binary vector for agrobacterium-mediated infection was constructed using Gibson assembly. Following agroinoculation, the BChV full-length clone was able to induce a systemic infection of the cultivated B. vulgaris. The engineered virus was successfully aphid-transmitted when acquired from infected B. vulgaris and displayed the same host plant spectrum as wild-type virus. This new polerovirus infectious clone is a valuable tool to identify the viral determinants involved in host range and study BChV protein function, and can be used to screen sugar beet for BChV resistance.

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2018-09-14
2019-08-22
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