1887

Abstract

Apart from classical antigen-presenting cells (APCs) like dendritic cells and macrophages, there are semiprofessional APCs such as endothelial cells (ECs) and Langerhans' cells. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects a wide range of cell types including the ECs which are involved in the trafficking and homing of T cells. By investigating the interaction of naïve T cells obtained from HCMV-seronegative umbilical cord blood with autologous HCMV-infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), we could show that the activation of naïve T cells occurred after 1 day of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) exposure to HCMV-infected HUVECs. The percentage of activated T cells increased over time and the activation of naïve T cells was not induced by either autologous uninfected HUVECs or by autologous HCMV-infected fibroblasts. The activation of T cells occurred also when purified T cells were co-cultured with HCMV-infected HUVECs. In addition, in most of the donors only CD8 T cells were activated, when the purified T cells were exposed to HCMV-infected HUVECs. The activation of naïve T cells was inhibited when the NKG2D receptor was blocked on the surface of T cells and among the different NKG2D ligands, we identified two ligands (ULBP4 and MICA) on HCMV-infected HUVECs which might be the interaction partners of the NKG2D receptor. Using a functional cell culture assay, we could show that these activated naïve T cells specifically inhibited HCMV transmission. Altogether, we identified a novel specific activation mechanism of naïve T cells from the umbilical cord by HCMV-infected autologous HUVECs through interaction with NKG2D.

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2017-11-21
2019-09-18
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