1887

Abstract

The cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses through plasmodesmata requires viral movement proteins (MPs) encoded by a ‘triple gene block’ (TGB) and termed TGB1, TGB2 and TGB3. TGB3 is a small integral membrane protein that contains subcellular targeting signals and directs both TGB2 and the helicase domain-containing TGB1 protein to plasmodesmata-associated structures. Recently, we described a ‘binary movement block’ (BMB) coding for two MPs, BMB1 and BMB2. The BMB2 protein associates with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, accumulates at plasmodesmata-associated membrane bodies and directs the BMB1 helicase to these structures. TGB3 transport to cell peripheral bodies was previously shown to bypass the secretory pathway and involve a non-conventional mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that the intracellular transport of both poa semilatent virus TGB3 and hibiscus green spot virus BMB2 to plasmodesmata-associated sites can occur via lateral translocation along the ER membranes. Agrobacterium-mediated transient co-expression in leaves revealed that green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused actin-binding domains of fimbrin (ABD2–GFP) and mouse talin (TAL–GFP) inhibited the subcellular targeting of TGB3 and BMB2 to plasmodesmata-associated bodies, which resulted in TGB3 and BMB2 accumulation in the cytoplasm in association with aberrant ER structures. Inhibition of COPII budding complex formation by the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the small GTPase Sar1 had no detectable effect on BMB2 subcellular targeting, which therefore could occur without exit from the ER in COPII transport vesicles. Collectively, the presented data support the current view that plant viral MPs exploit the ER:actin network for their intracellular transport.

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2017-09-01
2019-12-11
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