1887

Abstract

Neuroinflammation is a prominent component of several neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, tauopathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion diseases. In such conditions, the ability to decrease neuroinflammation by drug therapy may influence disease progression. Statins have been used to treat hyperlipidemia as well as reduce neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in various tissues. In previous studies, treatment of scrapie-infected mice with the type 1 statins, simvastatin or pravastatin, showed a small beneficial effect on survival time. In the current study, to increase the effectiveness of statin therapy, we treated infected mice with atorvastatin, a type 2 statin that has improved pharmacokinetics over many type 1 statins. Treatments with either simvastatin or pravastatin were tested for comparison. We evaluated scrapie-infected mice for protease-resistant PrP (PrPres) accumulation, gliosis, neuroinflammation and time until advanced clinical disease requiring euthanasia. All three statin treatments reduced total serum cholesterol ≥40 % in mice. However, gliosis and PrPres deposition were similar in statin-treated and untreated infected mice. Time to euthanasia due to advanced clinical signs was not changed in statin-treated mice relative to untreated mice, a finding at odds with previous reports. Expression of 84 inflammatory genes involved in neuroinflammation was also quantitated. Seven genes were reduced by pravastatin, and one gene was reduced by atorvastatin. In contrast, simvastatin therapy did not reduce any of the tested genes, but did slightly increase the expression of and . Our studies indicate that none of the three statins tested were effective in reducing scrapie-induced neuroinflammation or neuropathogenesis.

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2017-08-01
2020-01-24
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