1887

Abstract

Analysis of the recently completed genomic sequence of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus-8) revealed that ORF 50 encodes a protein with homology to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transcription factor R. In this report, we show that ORF K8, contiguous to ORF 50, is interrupted by two introns and that the spliced RNA is translated into a bZip protein that has homology to the EBV transcription factor EB1. The newly characterized K8 protein forms homodimers but does not heterodimerize with other members of the bZip protein family.

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1999-03-01
2022-05-19
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