1887

Abstract

Mature lymphomas produced in Rhode Island Red (RIR) chickens infected with the RB1B strain of Marek’s disease virus (MDV) were examined for the presence of viral DNA and RNA and expression of viral antigens. hybridization showed that all tumours examined contained viral DNA in areas of lymphoid infiltration. In 3/5 tumours, there was a correlation between the number and distribution of cells expressing the Marek’s disease EcoRI-Q gene and those that carried the lymphoid cell marker AV37. Expression of the MDV-specific phos- phoprotein pp38 was infrequent in lymphomas but abundant in a splenic tumour which also expressed the viral glycoprotein gB. Northern blot analysis of lymphocyte fractions purified by immunoaffinity showed that CD4 andAV37 fractions from lymphomas expressed and the small RNA antisense to ICP4 (SAR). The results are consistent with the notion that transformed cells are CD4cells, carrying the AV37 marker and expressing and SAR.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-9-2191
1997-09-01
2022-05-28
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/78/9/9292006.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-9-2191&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Akiyama Y., Kato S. 1974; Two cell lines from lymphomas of Marek’s disease. Biken Journal 17:105–116
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anderson A. S., Francesconi A., Morgan R. W. 1992; Complete nucleotide sequence of the Marek’s disease virus ICP4 gene. Virology 189:657–667
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Baigent S., Ross L. J. N., Davison T. F. 1996; A flow cytometric method for identifying Marek’s disease virus pp38 expression in lymphocyte subpopulations. Avian Pathology 25:255–267
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Burgess S. C., Kaiser P., Davison T. F. 1997; A novel lympho-blastoid surface antigen and its role in Marek’s disease. In Proceedings of 5th International Symposium on Marek’s disease East Lansing, Michigan, USA: in press
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Cantello J. L., Anderson A. S., Morgan R. W. 1994; Identification of latency-associated transcripts that map antisense to the ICP4 homolog gene of Marek’s disease virus. Journal of Virology 68:6280–6290
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Calnek B. W., Shek W. R., Schat K. A. 1981; Spontaneous and induced herpesvirus genome expression in Marek’s disease tumour cell lines. Infection and Immunity 34:483–491
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Chan M. M., Chen C.-L. H., Ager L. L., Cooper M. D. 1988; Identification of the avian homologues of mammalian CD4 and CD8 antigens. Journal of Immunology 140:2133–2138
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Cui Z., Lee L. F., Liu J.-L., Kung H. J. 1991; Structural analysis and transcriptional mapping of the Marek’s disease virus gene encoding pp38, an antigen associated with transformed cells. Journal of Virology 65:6509–6515
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Daly C., Reich N. C. 1995; Characterization of specific DNA- binding factors activated by double-stranded RNA as positive regulators of interferon α/β-stimulated genes. Journal of Biological Chemistry 270:23739–23746
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Davidson I., Borovskaya A., Perl S., Malkinson M. 1995; Use of the polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of natural infection of chickens and turkeys with Marek’s disease virus and reticuloendotheliosis virus. Avian Pathology 24:69–94
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Delecluse H.-J., Schuller S., Hammerschmidt W. 1993; Latent Marek’s disease virus can be activated from its chromosomally integrated state in herpesvirus-transformed lymphoma cells. EMBO Journal 12:3277–3286
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Jones D., Lee L. F., Liu J.-L., Kung H. J., Tillotson J. 1992; Marek’s disease virus encodes a basic leucine zipper gene resembling the fos/jun oncogenes that is highly expressed in lymphoblastoid tumours. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 89:4042–4046
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kaiser P., Rothwell L., Baigent S., Davison T. F. 1996; Characterisation of an antigen expressed on Marek’s disease tumour cells. In Poultry Immunology Davison T. F., Morris T. R., Payne L. N. Edited by Abingdon, UK: Carfax Science Publishers;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kawamura M., Hayashi M., Furuichi T., Nonoyama M., Isogai E., Namioka S. 1991; The inhibitory effects of oligonucleotides complementary to Marek’s disease virus mRNA transcribed from the BamHI-H region on the proliferation of transformed lymphoblastoid cells, MDCC-MSB1. Journal of General Virology 72:1105–1111
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Kopacek J., Ross L. J. N., Zelnik V., Pastorek J. 1993; The 132 bp repeats are present in RNA transcripts from 1·8 kb gene family of Marek’s disease virus-transformed cells. Acta Virologica 37:191–195
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Koptidesova D., Kopacek J., Zelnik V., Ross L. J. N., Pastorekova S., Pastorek J. 1995; Identification and characterization of a cDNA clone derived from the Marek’s disease tumour cell line RPL1 encoding a homologue of α-transducing factor (VP16) of HSV-1. Archives of Virology 140:355–362
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Li D. S., Pastorek J., Zelnik V., Smith G. D., Ross L. J. N. 1994; Identification of novel transcripts complementary to the Marek’s disease virus homologue of the ICP4 gene of herpes simplex virus. Journal of General Virology 75:1713–1722
    [Google Scholar]
  18. McColl K., Calnek B. W., Harris W. V., Schat K. A., Lee L. F. 1987; Expression of a putative tumour-associated antigen on normal versus Marek’s disease virus-transformed lymphocytes. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 79:991–1000
    [Google Scholar]
  19. McKie E. A., Ubukata E., Hasegawa S., Zhang S., Nonoyama M., Tanaka A. 1995; The transcripts from the sequences flanking the short component ofMarek’s disease virus during latent infection form a unique family of 3′ coterminal RNAs. Journal of Virology 69:1310–1314
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Maotani K., Kanamori A., Ikuta K., Ueda S., Kato S., Hirai K. 1986; Amplification of a tandem direct repeat within inverted repeats of Marek’s disease virus DNA during serial in vitro passage. Journal of Virology 58:657–660
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Naito M., Nakajima K., Iwa N., Ono K., Yoshida I., Konobe T., Ikuta K., Ueda S., Kato S., Hirai K. 1986; Demonstration of a Marek’s disease virus-specific antigen in tumour lesions of chickens with Marek’s disease using monoclonal antibody against a virus phosphorylated protein. Avian Pathology 15:503–510
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Nazerian K., Stephens E. A., Sharma J. M., Lee L. F., Gailitis M., Witter R. L. 1977; A non-producer T lymphoblastoid cell line from Marek’s disease transplantable tumour (JMV). Avian Diseases 21:69–76
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Ohashi K., Zhou W., O’Connell P. H., Schat K. A. 1994; Characterization of a Marek’s disease virus BamHI-A-specific cDNA clone obtained from a Marek’s disease lymphoblastoid cell line. Virology 199:275–283
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Payne L. N., Howes K., Rennie M., Bumstead J. M., Kidd A. W. 1981; Use of an agar culture technique for establishing lymphoid cell lines from Marek’s disease lymphomas. International Journal of Cancer 28:756–766
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Peng Q., Shirazi Y. 1996a; Isolation and characterization of Marek’s disease virus (MDV) cDNAs from an MDV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line : identification of an open reading frame antisense to the MDV Eco-Q protein (Meq). Virology 221:368–374
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Peng Q., Shirazi Y. 1996b; Characterization of the protein product encoded by a splicing variant of the Marek’s disease virus Eco-Q gene (Meq). Virology 226:77–82
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Peng Q., Donovan J., Specter S., Tanaka A., Nonoyama M. 1993; Prolonged proliferation ofprimary chicken embryo fibroblasts transfected with cDNAs from the BamHI-H gene family of Marek’s disease virus. International Journal of Oncology 3:587–591
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Powell P. C., Payne L. N., Frazier J. A., Rennie M. 1974; T lymphoblastoid cell lines from Marek’s disease lymphomas. Nature 251:79–80
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Powell P. C., Howes K., Lawn A. M., Mustill B. M., Payne L. N., Rennie M., Thompson M. A. 1984; Marek’s disease in turkeys: the induction of lesions and the establishment of lymphoid cell lines. Avian Pathology 13:201–214
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Qian Z., Brunovskis P., Raucher F. III Lee L., Kung H.-J. 1995; Transactivation activity of Meq, a Marek’s disease herpesvirus bZip protein persistently expressed in latently infected transformed T cells. Journal of Virology 69:4037–4044
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Qian Z., Brunovskis P., Lee L., Vogt P. K., Kung H.-J. 1996; Novel DNA binding specificities of a putative herpesvirus bZip oncoprotein. Journal of Virology 70:7161–7170
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Ross L. J. N., Powell P. C., Walker D. J., Rennie M., Payne L. N. 1977; Expression of virus-specific, thymus-specific and tumour-specific antigens in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Marek’s disease lymphomas. Journal of General Virology 35:219–235
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Schat K. A., Calnek B. W., Fabricant J. 1982; Characterisation of two highly oncogenic strains of Marek’s disease virus. Avian Pathology 11:593–605
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Schat K. A., Chen C. L., Calnek B. W., Char D. 1991; Transformation of T lymphocyte subsets by Marek’s disease herpesvirus. Journal of Virology 65:1408–1413
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Sekellick M. J., Marcus P. I. 1986; Induction of high titer chicken interferon. Methods in Microbiology 119:115–125
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Silva R. F., Witter R. L. 1985; Induction of high titer chicken interferon. Methods in Enzymology 119:115–125
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Volpini L. M., Calnek B. W., Sekellick M. J., Marcus P. I. 1995; Stages of Marek’s disease virus latency defined by variable sensitivity to interferon modulation of viral antigen expression. Veterinary Microbiology 47:99–109
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Witter R. L., Stephens E. A., Sharma J. M., Nazerian K. 1975; Demonstration of a tumour-associated surface antigen in Marek’s disease. Journal of Immunology 115:177–183
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Xie Q., Anderson A. S., Morgan R. W. 1996; Marek’s disease virus (MDV) ICP4, pp38 and meq genes are involved in the maintenance of transformation of MDCC MSB-1 MDV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells. Journal of Virology 70:1125–1131
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-9-2191
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-9-2191
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error