1887

Abstract

Geminivirus isolates associated with the epidemic of severe cassava mosaic disease in Uganda were studied and compared with virus isolates from the part of Uganda outside the epidemic area, and with African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV). Isolates of a novel type [the Uganda variant (UgV)] were detected in severely affected plants from the epidemic area, whereas those from plants outside the epidemic area were typical of ACMV. The complete nucleotide sequences of DNA-A of UgV (2799 nt) and of a Tanzanian isolate of EACMV (2801 nt) were determined and are extremely similar, except for the coat protein (CP) gene. The CP gene of UgV has three distinct regions: the 5′ 219 nt are 99 % identical to EACMV (only 79 % to ACMV); the following 459 nt are 99 % identical to ACMV (75% to EACMV); and the 3′ 93 nt are 98 % identical to EACMV (76 % to ACMV). UgV DNA-A therefore is considered to have arisen by interspecific recombination of EACMV and ACMV. Despite the hybrid nature of their CP, UgV isolates were indistinguishable from ACMV in tests with 20 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), including seven which reacted with ACMV but not EACMV. The discontinuous epitopes detected by these seven MAbs must involve amino acids which lie in the central part of the CP (residues 74–226) and which differ in ACMV and EACMV. UgV isolates were detected in severely mosaic-affected plants from all 11 widely separated locations sampled. The probable role of recombination in geminivirus evolution in the short to medium term is discussed.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-8-2101
1997-08-01
2022-05-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/78/8/9267014.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-8-2101&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aiton M. M., Harrison B. D. 1989; Monoclonal antibodies to Indian cassava mosaic geminivirus (ICMV). Report of the Scottish Crop Research Institute for 1988 p. 175
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anon 1994 Program Manual for the Wisconsin Package, Version 8 Madison: Genetics Computer Group;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Argüello-Astorga G., Herrera-Estrella L., Rivera-Bustamente R. 1994; Experimental and theoretical definition of geminivirus origin of replication. Plant Molecular Biology 26:553–556
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Brown J. K., Bird J. 1992; Whitefly -transmitted geminiviruses and associated disorders in the Americas and the Caribbean Basin. Plant Disease 76:220–225
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Fargette D., Fauquet C., Thouvenel J. -C. 1988; Yield losses induced by African cassava mosaic virus in relation to the mode and the date of infection. Tropical Pest Management 34:89–91
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Fontes E. P. B., Luckow V. A., Hanley-Bowdoin L. 1992; A geminivirus replication protein is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. Plant Cell 4:597–608
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gilbertson R. L., Rojas M. R., Russell D. R., Maxwell D. P. 1991; Use of the asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing to determine genetic variability of bean golden mosaic geminivirus in the Dominican Republic. Journal of General Virology 72:2843–2848
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Harrison B. D., Robinson D. J. 1988; Molecular variation in vector- borne plant viruses: epidemiological significance. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 321:447–462
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Harrison B. D., Swanson M. M., McGrath P. F., Fargette D. 1991; Patterns of antigenic variation in whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Report of the Scottish Crop Research Institute for 1990 pp. 88–90
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Harrison B. D., Liu Y. L., Zhou X., Robinson D. J., Calvert L., Otim-Nape G. W. 1996; Properties, differentiation and geographical distribution of geminiviruses that cause cassava mosaic. In Abstracts of the Third International Meeting, Cassava Biotechnology Network (CBN III)26-31 August 1996Kampala, Uganda p. 16
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Harrison B. D., Liu Y. L., Khalid S., Hameed S., Otim-Nape W., Robinson D. J. 1997; Detection and relationships of cotton leaf curl virus and allied whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses occurring in Pakistan. Annals of Applied Biology 130:61–75
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hong Y. G., Harrison B. D. 1995; Nucleotide sequences from tomato leaf curl viruses from different countries: evidence for three geographically separate branches in evolution of the coat protein of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Journal of General Virology 76:2043–2049
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hong Y. G., Robinson D. J., Harrison B. D. 1993; Nucleotide sequence evidence for the occurrence of three distinct whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses in cassava. Journal of General Virology 74:2437–2443
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Hou Y. -M., Gilbertson R. L. 1996; Increased pathogenicity in a pseudorecombinant bipartite geminivirus correlates with intermolecular recombination. Journal of Virology 70:5430–5436
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Macintosh S., Robinson D. J., Harrison B. D. 1992; Detection of three whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses occurring in Europe by tests with heterologous monoclonal antibodies. Annals ofApplied Biology 121:297–303
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Martin E. F. 1928; Report of the mycologist. Annual Report of the Department of Agriculture, Uganda p. 31 Entebbe, Uganda: Government Printer;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Muniyappa V., Swanson M. M., Duncan G. H., Harrison B. D. 1991; Particle purification, properties and epitope variability of Indian tomato leaf curl geminivirus. Annals of Applied Biology 118:595–604
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Nateshan H. M., Muniyappa V., Swanson M. M., Harrison B. D. 1996; Host range, vector relations and serological relationships of cotton leaf curl virus from southern India. Annals of Applied Biology 128:233–244
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Otim-Nape G. W., Thresh J. M., Fargette D. 1996; Bemisia tabaci and cassava mosaic virus disease in Africa. In Bemisia 1995: Taxonomy, Biology, Damage, Control and Management pp. 319–350 Gerling D., Meyer R. T. Edited by Andover: Intercept;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Padidam M., Beachy R. N., Fauquet C. M. 1995; Classification and identification of geminiviruses using sequence comparisons. Journal of General Virology 76:249–263
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Robinson D. J., Hamilton W. D. O., Harrison B. D., Baulcombe D. C. 1987; Two anomalous tobravirus isolates: evidence for RNA recombination in nature. Journal of General Virology 68:2551–2561
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Rojas M. R., Gilbertson R. L., Russell D. R., Maxwell D. P. 1993; Use of degenerate primers in the polymerase chain reaction to detect whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Plant Disease 77:340–347
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Rybicki E. P. 1994; A phylogenetic and evolutionary justification for three genera of Geminiviridae. Archives of Virology 139:49–77
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Stanley J., Gay M. R. 1983; Nucleotide sequence of cassava latent virus DNA. Nature (London) 301:260–262
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Stanley J., Markham P. G., Callis R. J., Pinner M. S. 1986; The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of the geminivirus beet curly top virus. EMBO Journal 5:1761–1767
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Swanson M. M. 1992 Antigenic variation and serological relationships of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses PhD thesis University of Dundee, UK:
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Swanson M. M., Harrison B. D. 1993; Serological relationships and epitope profiles of isolates of okra leaf curl geminivirus from Africa and the Middle East. Biochimie 75:707–711
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Swanson M. M., Harrison B. D. 1994; Properties, relationships and distribution of cassava mosaic geminiviruses. Tropical Science 34:15–25
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Swanson M. M., Brown J. K., Poulos B. T., Harrison B. D. 1992; Genome affinities and epitope profiles of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses from the Americas. Annals of Applied Biology 121:285–296
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Thomas J. E., Massalski P. R., Harrison B. D. 1986; Production of monoclonal antibodies to African cassava mosaic virus and differences in their reactivities with other whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Journal of General Virology 67:2739–2748
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Torres-Pacheco I., Garzon-Tiznado J. A., Herrera-Estrella L., Rivera-Bustamente R. F. 1993; Complete nucleotide sequence of pepper huasteco virus : analysis and comparison with bipartite gemini-viruses. Journal of General Virology 74:2225–2231
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-8-2101
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-8-2101
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error