1887

Abstract

We have isolated paraspherical viral particles, 60 nm in diameter, from adults of the olive fly () collected in Greece. The virus actively replicated in midgut epithelial cells and in advanced infections virions accumulated in microvilli. They were released in the gut lumen and were very abundant in fly faeces. The virions exhibited the salient features of reoviruses, with an external shell and an internal core with a tubular subunit protruding at each vertex of the icosahedron. The viral genome consisted of ten segments of doublestranded RNA totalling 23·4 kbp. Based on its overall properties, this virus can be considered as a nonoccluded insect reovirus.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-1-259
1997-01-01
2022-05-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/78/1/9010312.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-1-259&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Anagnou-Veroniki M., Bergoin M., Veyrunes J. C. 1984; Research on the viral infection of Dacus oleae (Gmel). In Agriculture. C.E.C. Programme on Integrated and Biological Control. EUR. 8689 pp. 201–207 Cavalloro R., Piavaux A. Edited by
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anagnou-Veroniki M., Veyrunes J. C., Jousset F. X., Bergoin M. 1991; Susceptibility ofthe olive fruit fly (Dacus oleae) to viral infections. IOBC/WPRS Bulletin, 1991/XIV/7 pp. 163–164
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Arambourg Y. 1986 Traité d’Entomologie Oléicole pp. 1–360 Madrid: Conseil Oléicole International;
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Broumas T., Haniotakis G., Yamvrias C., Stavrakis G. 1990; Comparative study of a mass trapping method and various bait sprays for the control of the olive fruit fly - first year results. In Pesticides and Alternatives pp. 205–215 Cassida J. E. Edited by Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Publishers;
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Fuji-Kawata I., Miuri K. I., Fuke M. 1970; Segments of genome of viruses containing double-stranded ribonucleic acid. Journal of Molecular Biology 51:247–253
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Giles K. W., Myers A. 1965; An improved diphenylamine method for the estimation of deoxyribonucleic acid. Nature 206:93
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Haars R., Zentgraf H., Gateff E., Bautz F. A. 1980; Evidence for endogenous reovirus-like particles in a tissue culture cell line from Drosophila melanogaster . Virology 101:124–130
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Haniotakis G. E., Kozyrakis M., Bonatsos K. 1987; Area-wide management of the olive fruit fly by feeding attractants and sex pheromones on toxic traps. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on ‘Fruit Flies’16-21 September 1986Crete, Greece pp. 549–560
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Manousis T., Moore N. F. 1987; Searching for viruses pathogenic for the olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae Gmelin. In Fruit Flies of Economic Importance Cavalloro R. Edited by Proceedings of the CEC/IOBC International SymposiumRome, Italy7-10 April 1987
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Manousis T., Eley S. M., Pullin J. S. K., Lambropoulos A., Moore N. F. 1986; Preliminary search for a virus in Dacus oleae Gmel. populations in northern Greece. Entolomogia Hellenica 4:15–18
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Mejbaum W. Z. 1939; Über die Bestimmung kliener Pentosemengen, insbesonder in Derivaten der Adenylsaure. Zeitschrift für Physiologische Chemie 258:117–120
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Moussa A. Y. 1978; A new virus disease in the housefly, Musca domestica (Diptera). Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 31:204–216
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Murphy F. A., Fauquet C. M., Bishop D. H. L., Ghabrial S. A., Jarvis A. W., Martelli G. P., Mayo M. A., Summers M. D. editor 1995 Virus Taxonomy. Sixth Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses Vienna & New York: Springer-Verlag;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Payne C. C., Mertens P. P. C. 1983; Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses. In The Reoviridae pp. 425–504 Joklik W. K. Edited by Plenum Press: New York;
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Payne C. C., Rivers C. F. 1976; A provisional classification of cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses based on the sizes of the RNA genome segments. Journal of General Virology 33:71–85
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Plus N., Gissman L., Veyrunes J. C., Pfister H., Gateff E. 1981a; Reoviruses of Drosophila and Ceratitis populations and of Drosophila cell lines: a new genus of the Reoviridae family. Annales de Virologie (Institut Pasteur) 132E:261–270
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Plus N., Veyrunes J. C., Cavalloro R. 1981b; Endogenous viruses of Ceratitis capitata Wied. ‘J.R.C. Ispra strain’ and C. capitata permanent cell lines. Annales de Virologie (Institut Pasteur) 132E:91–100
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ramig R. F., Cross R. K., Fields B. N. 1977; Genome RNAs and polypeptides of reovirus serotypes 1, 2 and 3. Journal of Virology 22:726–733
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Tzanakakis M. E. 1967; Control of the Olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae Gmel., with radiation or chemical sterilization procedures. Final Technical Report at the ‘Democritos’ Nuclear Research Center, Greece:
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-1-259
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-78-1-259
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error