1887

Abstract

The sequence data presented in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ sequence database and assigned accession numbers D26079 (CPV-Y1), D26080 (CPV-ob1) and D26081 (CPV-CP49).

Feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV), mink enteritis virus (MEV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) are more than 98 % similar in DNA and predicted amino acid sequences, but they show different host-cell specificities; CPV is able to replicate in canine cells in culture, whereas FPLV and MEV cannot or replicate only to a low titre. To map the genomic region responsible for the host range of CPV , CPV/MEV chimeric viruses were generated by transfecting infectious CPV/MEV chimeric plasmids into a cultured feline kidney cell line, and their host cell ranges were analysed. The 60 to 91 map units (m.u.) region of the CPV genome, which contains a part of the capsid protein (VP) gene encoding from amino acid 91 (in the VP2 sequence) to the carboxy terminus of VP protein, was required to impart the ability to replicate in canine cells to MEV, although the chimeric virus containing the 60 to 91 m.u. region of the CPV genome in the MEV background did not replicate in canine cells as efficiently as did CPV derived from the infectious plasmid of CPV. Not only the VP gene, but also a part of the NS gene of CPV were considered to participate in the full expression of the ability to replicate in canine cells. Within the 60 to 91 m.u. region, five of nine amino acid changes between MEV-Abashiri and CPV-Y1 were thought to be phylogenetically CPV-common; however, a recombinant virus containing all five amino acid changes of CPV in the MEV background replicated minimally in canine cells.

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1994-06-01
2022-05-28
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