1887

Abstract

Nine open reading frames mapping in the short unique (U) region of the genome of herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) were expressed by transcription and translation. The observed s of US10, SORF3 and US2 were as predicted from the sequence but there were discrepancies between the observed and predicted s of US1, protein kinase, gl, gD and gE. These could be accounted for in most cases by post-translational and co-translational processing. Analysis of the synthesized products at different time points provided evidence for post-translational modification of HVT protein kinase. Translation in the presence of microsomal membranes resulted in co-translational processing of HVT gD, gl and gE by glycosylation and signal peptide cleavage.

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1994-10-01
2021-10-22
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