1887

Abstract

The VP-2 gene of mink enteritis parvovirus (MEV) was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction using MEV DNA isolated from the faeces of a naturally infected mink. Subsequently the VP-2 gene was cloned into a baculovirus expression vector. Recombinant baculo-viruses were isolated and the MEV VP-2 gene product was characterized after expression in Sf9 insect cells. The MEV VP-2 product had the same size as that reported for the wild-type MEV VP-2 protein and was recognized by convalescent sera from MEV-infected mink and a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive to MEV. Furthermore, the VP-2 protein was able to form parvovirus-like particles, which had haemagglutinating properties comparable with the wild-type MEV. The cloned VP-2 gene was sequenced and only five nucleotide differences were found after alignment with the known sequences of the MEV type 1 and type 2 isolates. Surprisingly, the VP-2 gene encoded a valine and a tyrosine at amino acid positions 232 and 234, identical to the situation found in MEV type 1, but at position 300 there was a valine which is a determinant of MEV type 2. Immunization of mink with approximately 40000 haemagglutinating units of recombinant MEV VP-2 induced a measurable antibody response as tested by haemagglutination inhibition. Furthermore, the immunized mink did not excrete virus and did not develop clinical disease upon challenge with a virulent isolate of MEV.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-75-1-149
1994-01-01
2022-12-01
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/75/1/JV0750010149.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-75-1-149&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Alexandersen S., Carpenter S. 1991; Characterization of variable regions in the envelope and S3 open reading frame of equine infectious anemia virus. Journal of Virology 65:4255–4262
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bloom M. E., Alexandersen S., Perryman S., Lechner D., Wolfinbarger J. B. 1988; Nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV): sequence comparisons between a nonpathogenic and a pathogenic strain of ADV. Journal of Virology 62:2903–2915
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brown C. S., Salimans M. M. M., Noteborn M. H. M., Weiland H. T. 1990; Antigenic parvovirus B19 coat proteins VP1 and VP2 produced in large quantities in a baculovirus expression system. Virus Research 15:197–212
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Burger D., Gorham J. R. 1970; Mink virus enteritis. In Infectious Diseases of Wild Mammals David J. W., Karstad L. H., Trainer D. L. Edited by Ames: Iowa State University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Carman P. S., Povey R. C. 1983; Comparison of the viral proteins of canine parvovirus-2, mink enteritis virus and feline panleukopenia virus. Veterinary Microbiology 8:423–435
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Christensen J., Storgaard T., Bloch B., Alexandersen S., Aasted B. 1993; Expression of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus proteins in a baculovirus vector system. Journal of Virology 67:229–238
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Cotmore S. F., Tattersall P. 1987; The autonomously replicating parvoviruses. Advances in Virus Research 33:91–174
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Jongeneel C. V., Sahli R., Mcmaster G. K., Hirt B. 1986; A precise map of splice junctions in the mRNAs of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus. Journal of Virology 59:564–573
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Kariatsumari T., Horiuchi M., Hama E., Yaguchi K., Ishigurio N., Goto H., Shinagawa M. 1991; Construction and nucleotide sequence analysis of an infectious DNA clone of the autonomous parvovirus, mink enteritis virus. Journal of General Virology 12:867–875
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Knox B. 1960; Udbrud af virus enteritis hos mink i Danmark. Nordisk Veterinaermedicin 12:145–169
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kozak M. 1983; Comparison of initiation of protein synthesis in procaryotes, eucaryotes, and organelles. Microbiological Reviews 47:1–45
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Laemmli U. K. 1970; Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature; London: 227680–685
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Lanford R. E., Luckow V., Kennedy R. C., Dreesman G. R., Notvall L., Summers M. D. 1989; Expression and characterization of hepatitis B virus surface antigen polypeptides in insect cells with a baculovirus expression system. Journal of Virology 63:1549–1557
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Luckow V. A., Summers M. D. 1988; Trends in the development of baculovirus expression vectors. Bio/Technology 6:47–55
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Luckow V. A., Summers M. D. 1989; High level expression of nonfused foreign genes with Autographa californica nuclear poly-hedrosis virus expression vectors. Virology 170:31–39
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Luo M., Tsao J., Rossman M. G., Basak S., Compans R. W. 1988; Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of canine parvovirus crystals. Journal of Molecular Biology 200:209–211
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Maniatis T., Fritsch E. F., Sambrook J. 1982 Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Paradiso P. R., Rhode S. L.III Singer I I. 1982; Canine parvovirus: a biochemical and ultrastructural characterization. Journal of General Virology 62:113–125
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Parrish C. R. 1990; Emergence, natural history, and variation of canine, mink, and feline parvoviruses. Advances in Virus Research 38:403–441
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Parrish C. R., Carmichael L. E., Antczak D. F. 1982; Antigenic relationships between canine parvovirus type 2, feline panleukopenia virus and mink enteritis virus using conventional antisera and monoclonal antibodies. Archives of Virologv 72:267–278
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Parrish C. R., Gorham J. R., Schwartz T., Carmichael L. E. 1984; Characterization of antigenic variation among mink enteritis virus isolates. American Journal of Veterinary Research 45:2591–2599
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Parrish C. R., Aquadro C. F., Carmichael L. E. 1988; Canine host range and a specific epitope map along with variant sequences in the capsid protein gene of canine parvovirus and related feline, mink, and raccoon parvoviruses. Virology 166:293–307
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Parrish C. R., Aquadro C. F., Strassheim M. L., Evermann J. F., Sgro J.-Y., Mohammed H. O. 1991; Rapid antigenic-type replacement and DNA sequence evolution of canine parvovirus. Journal of Virology 65:6544–6552
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Saliki J. T., Mizak B., Flore H. P., Gettig R. R., Burand J. P., Carmichael L. E., Wood H. A., Parrish C. R. 1992; Canine parvovirus empty capsids produced by expression in a baculovirus vector: use in analysis of viral properties and immunization of dogs. Journal of General Virology 73:369–374
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Siegl G. 1984; Biology and pathogenicity of autonomous parvoviruses. In The Parvoviruses pp. 297–349 Berns K. I. Edited by New York: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Uttenthal Å. 1988; Apparent lack of effect of vaccination against mink enteritis virus (MEV).A challenge study. Archives of Virologv 99:153–161
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Vialard J., Lalumiere M., Vernet T., Briedis D., Alkhatib G., Henning D., Levin D., Richardson C. 1990; Synthesis of the membrane fusion and hemagglutinin proteins of measles virus, using a novel baculovirus vector containing the beta-galactosidase gene. Journal of Virology 64:37–50
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Wills C. G. 1952; Notes on infectious enteritis of mink and its relationship to feline enteritis. Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine 16:419–420
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-75-1-149
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-75-1-149
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error