1887

Abstract

The glycoprotein H (gH) genes of two avian herpesviruses, Marek’s disease virus and the herpesvirus of turkeys, have been cloned and sequenced and the coding regions found to be of 2439 and 2424 nucleotides respectively. The predicted primary polypeptide products of these open reading frames are 813 and 808 amino acids and correspond to s of 90 800 and 91 100. Both amino acid sequences exhibit characteristic glycoprotein features such as hydrophobic signal and anchor sequences and potential sites for -linked glycosylation. Polypeptide sequence comparison to the other eight available gH sequences revealed more similarity to the alphaherpesvirus subgroup than to either beta- or gammaherpesviruses.

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1993-06-01
2022-11-27
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