1887

Abstract

Cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 were studied using primary human and mouse epidermal keratinocytes. The E7 transforming gene of HPV-16 was found to induce chromosome duplication in epidermal keratinocytes; little or no detectable chromosome disorganization was associated with the function of the E6 gene. These results suggest that the E7 gene-linked cytogenetic effect reflects HPV-16-associated pathogenicity in the early phase of transformation.

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1991-07-01
2022-12-07
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